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Creating biophilic mood boards with interior designer, Lucy Gleeson

WordsLucy Gleeson

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This guest post is written by biophilic interior designer, Lucy Gleeson.

Defining your biophilic style

Connecting ourselves to the outdoors has been proven to reduce stress, improve wellbeing and happiness, and even aid creativity and productivity. In our homes, therefore, we know that adding natural elements to our living spaces can be extremely beneficial.

This design process used for this is known as biophilia, which simply means a ‘love of life’. Although very much on-trend right now - demonstrated by the big resurgence of house plants in recent years - we have always been intrinsically drawn to nature in our homes, sometimes without even realising it. 

If you have a garden then you can work with your surroundings and views to create a flow from the outside in, but even in a very urban setting, you can do so much to encourage a biophilic outcome.

Of course, there are so many aspects to consider when making design decisions - from your paint colours, wallpaper prints, textiles, textures, flooring, to materials for worktops and tiles. Any or all of these will contribute to a balanced, biophilic feel in your home.

Which biophilic mood board suits you best?

So, where is the best place to start? Knowing how designers sometimes look at their client’s seasonal type to put together mood boards and colour palettes helps. It certainly helps break down which colours, textures, shapes and even plants make someone feel most comfortable.

Seasonal types are divided into Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. In interior design, you can identify your seasonal type depending on which colour palette you are instinctively drawn to.

So, here is a little journey you can take yourself on to decipher which biophilic scheme you are most drawn to. Hopefully, these mood boards will inspire you to incorporate biophilic elements into your design scheme and - in doing so - unite with the great outdoors.

Spring mood board

If you are a Spring type, when it comes to design you will naturally be drawn to pastel colours (think happy confetti) such as Pink 02 and Yellow 01. Wallpapers that are fresh and botanical - such as Jungle 02 (beautiful when paired with Green 04) - will give your space a lovely natural feel. You might also opt for lots of light primary colours including pinks, purples, blues.

It tends to be light and airy in a Spring person’s home; with light wood flooring and an abundance of plants, including succulents. I like to consider using glass or in this instance crystals for inspiration.

Summer mood board

If you are a Summer type, then you’ll gravitate towards colours that are generally subtle and fresh. Imagine flowers in the garden at the height of summer. This is quite a sophisticated palette with mid pinks, purples like mauve or lilac Purple 01, and gentle greens like sage Green 02. Grey tones are often present, but warm, so Greige 01 is a perfect anchor! If you use blues then a cool one will be best. In terms of patterns, gentle botanical motifs will add a summer feel to any space. This Fern 01 botanical wallpaper is beautifully classic and connects to the outside, bringing the scheme together.

Lightweight, floaty fabrics such as linen are a perfect addition, along with more curved lines in furniture. I have mixed in some velvets in too that compliment the paints and make it feel soft and restful. Flowers will finish the space nicely.

Autumn mood board

I feel most drawn to this season in my home. It’s a lively, earthy and intense season - full of warmth. Autumnal mood boards are usually for those who like to max out in style.

Autumnal seasonal types are not afraid to go bold with dense wallpaper prints and rich colours. Village Cricket 01 is the perfect autumnal biophilic print. An array of nature focused colours can be used including warm greens - such as Green 05 and Green 06 -  and you can also use teals, deep purples and oranges. Golds and terracotta are a must to add lots of comfort and a sense of decadence to your scheme.

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