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How to make a mood board from scratch

How to make a mood board with Lick paint and wallpaper

WordsFrankie Marqueé

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Hands up who else has that decorating itch at the minute? That’s January for you – the month that gets you ringing the changes like no other. If you’re chomping at the bit to get creative in your home then one of the best tools to have in your arsenal (aside from a paintbrush and tin) is a mood board. We’re talking the analogue kind with magazine tears, fabric swatches and paint samples pinned onto it rather than the digital sort (as much as we love Pinterest, it’s doesn’t quite cut the mustard in the same way as a hands-on board). Over to Lick’s lead colour expert Tash to reveal the seven steps she followed when creating a mood board for her own home’s renovation.

But first, why is a mood board going to help me decorate?

Good question. All that gathering of ‘inspiration’ to cut out, sift through and stick up on your newly-acquired cork board sounds like a fair bit of faff, so is it really worth it?

We say 100% yes. Unless you’re the incredibly decisive sort, most of us are torn between this colour and that; this style of scheme that you’ve swooned over for months on end or that new one that you spied only a few days ago on Instagram but is now all you can think about; or what selection of fabrics is going to work best with your now-decided colour palette.

Point being, there’s an awful lot of fabulous inspiration out there, and therefore a whole bunch of decorating decisions to make. A mood board is your way of making sense of it all. A mood board is how interior designers curate, visualise and present back a scheme to a client so they can get a real feel for how everything hangs together. A mood board gives you focus, confidence and can even help you manage your decorating budget.

Need further convincing? Hear the reasons why Tash, our Lead Colour Specialist swears by mood boards and how she used one when decorating her own studio flat in South London.

Seven simple steps to creating your own mood board

Unsure of where to begin? Tash breaks down the process she went through when designing her mood board so that you can collect and curate like a pro.

Step one: lay out your workspace

A physical mood board asks for, you guessed it, a board. Whether that’s your classic cork noticeboard, a pretty and padded fabric one, or even something as simple as an ultra-thick piece of cardboard torn, this is your backdrop to stick everything onto. So clear a space, have that in front of you, some glues, some scissors, and everything you’ve gathered so far, from fabric cuttings to photos you’ve printed off or snipped from a magazine.

If you haven’t started collecting inspiration, then add to your workspace a generous stack of magazines ready for scouring through.

Tash’s tip: “try not to rely solely on magazines from the same month or your inspiration will be too seasonal and could hone in on the same trend. Ideally, you’d want magazines from across the year, or a few months back at least, so you get a rich and varied bank of imagery.”

“Try not to rely solely on magazines from the same month or your inspirational will be too seasonal and could hone in on the same trend. Ideally, you’d want magazines from across the year, or a few months back at least, so you get a rich and varied bank of imagery.”

Tash Bradley
Floral wallpaper mood board with Lick paint samples
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